Publications

In Press
Chu C*, Zhao B*, Park PJ, Lee EA. Identification and Genotyping of Transposable Element Insertions from Genome Sequencing Data. Current Protocols in Human Genetics (accepted) In Press;Abstract

Transposable element (TE) mobilization is a significant source of genomic variation and has been associated with various human diseases. The exponential growth of population-scale whole-genome sequencing and rapid innovations in long-read sequencing technologies provide unprecedented opportunities to study TE insertions and their functional impact in human health and disease. Identifying TE insertions, however, is challenging due to the repetitive nature of the TE sequences. Here, we review computational approaches to detecting and genotyping TE insertions using short- and long-read sequencing and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches.

Kim J, Zhao B, Huang AY, Miller MB, Lodato MA, Walsh CA**, Lee EA**. Evidence that APP gene copy number changes reflect recombinant vector contamination [Internet]. Nature (accepted) biorxiv DOI 10.1101/706788v2 In Press; Publisher's VersionAbstract

Mutations that occur in cells of the body, called somatic mutations, cause human diseases including cancer and some neurological disorders1. In a recent study published in Nature, Lee et al.2 (hereafter “the Lee study”) reported somatic copy number gains of the APP gene, a known risk locus of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), in the neurons of AD-patients and controls (69% vs 25% of neurons with at least one APP copy gain on average). The authors argue that the mechanism of these copy number gains was somatic integration of APP mRNA into the genome, creating what they called genomic cDNA (gencDNA). We reanalyzed the data from the Lee study, revealing evidence that APP gencDNA originates mainly from contamination by exogenous APP recombinant vectors, rather from true somatic retrotransposition of endogenous APP. Our reanalysis of two recent whole exome sequencing (WES) datasets—one by the authors of the Lee study3 and the other by Park et al.4—revealed that reads claimed to support APP gencDNA in AD samples resulted from contamination by PCR products and mRNA, respectively. Lastly, we present our own single-cell whole genome sequencing (scWGS) data that show no evidence for somatic APP retrotransposition in AD neurons or in neurons from normal individuals of various ages.

Submitted
Jain D, Chu C, Alver BH, Lee S, Lee EA, Park PJ. HiTea: a computational pipeline to identify non-reference transposable element insertions in Hi-C data [Internet]. biorxiv DOI 10.1101/2020.04.27.060145v1 (in revision) Submitted; Publisher's VersionAbstract
Hi-C is a common technique for assessing three-dimensional chromatin conformation. Recent studies have shown that long-range interaction information in Hi-C data can be used to generate chromosome-length genome assemblies and identify large-scale structural variations. Here, we demonstrate the use of Hi-C data in detecting mobile transposable element (TE) insertions genome-wide. Our pipeline HiTea (Hi-C based Transposable element analyzer) capitalizes on clipped Hi-C reads and is aided by a high proportion of discordant read pairs in Hi-C data to detect insertions of three major families of active human TEs. Despite the uneven genome coverage in Hi-C data, HiTea is competitive with the existing callers based on whole genome sequencing (WGS) data and can supplement the WGS-based characterization of the TE insertion landscape. We employ the pipeline to identify TE insertions from human cell-line Hi-C samples. HiTea is available at https://github.com/parklab/HiTea and as a Docker image.
2020
Rheinbay E, Nielsen MM, Abascal F, Wala JA, Shapira O, Tiao G, Hornshøj H, Hess JM, Juul RI, Lin Z, Feuerbach L, Sabarinathan R, Madsen T, Kim J, Mularoni L, Shuai S, Lanzós A, Herrmann C, Maruvka YE, Shen C, Amin SB, Bandopadhayay P, Bertl J, Boroevich KA, Busanovich J, Carlevaro-Fita J, Chakravarty D, Chan CWY, Craft D, Dhingra P, Diamanti K, Fonseca NA, Gonzalez-Perez A, Guo Q, Hamilton MP, Haradhvala NJ, Hong C, Isaev K, Johnson TA, Juul M, Kahles A, Kahraman A, Kim Y, Komorowski J, Kumar K, Kumar S, Lee D, Lehmann K-V, Li Y, Liu EM, Lochovsky L, Park K, Pich O, Roberts ND, Saksena G, Schumacher SE, Sidiropoulos N, Sieverling L, Sinnott-Armstrong N, Stewart C, Tamborero D, Tubio JMC, Umer HM, Uusküla-Reimand L, Wadelius C, Wadi L, Yao X, Zhang C-Z, Zhang J, Haber JE, Hobolth A, Imielinski M, Kellis M, Lawrence MS, von Mering C, Nakagawa H, Raphael BJ, Rubin MA, Sander C, Stein LD, Stuart JM, Tsunoda T, Wheeler DA, Johnson R, Reimand J, Gerstein M, Khurana E, Campbell PJ, López-Bigas N, and Group PCAWGDFIW, PCAWG Structural Variation Working Group (incl. Lee EA), Weischenfeldt J, Beroukhim R, Martincorena I, Pedersen JS, Getz G, Getz G. Analyses of non-coding somatic drivers in 2,658 cancer whole genomes. Nature 2020;578(7793):102-111.Abstract
The discovery of drivers of cancer has traditionally focused on protein-coding genes. Here we present analyses of driver point mutations and structural variants in non-coding regions across 2,658 genomes from the Pan-Cancer Analysis of Whole Genomes (PCAWG) Consortium of the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). For point mutations, we developed a statistically rigorous strategy for combining significance levels from multiple methods of driver discovery that overcomes the limitations of individual methods. For structural variants, we present two methods of driver discovery, and identify regions that are significantly affected by recurrent breakpoints and recurrent somatic juxtapositions. Our analyses confirm previously reported drivers, raise doubts about others and identify novel candidates, including point mutations in the 5' region of TP53, in the 3' untranslated regions of NFKBIZ and TOB1, focal deletions in BRD4 and rearrangements in the loci of AKR1C genes. We show that although point mutations and structural variants that drive cancer are less frequent in non-coding genes and regulatory sequences than in protein-coding genes, additional examples of these drivers will be found as more cancer genomes become available.
Cortés-Ciriano I, Lee JJ-K, Xi R, Jain D, Jung YL, Yang L, Gordenin D, Klimczak LJ, Zhang C-Z, Pellman DS, PCAWG Structural Variation Working Group (incl. Lee EA), Park PJ, PCAWG-Consortium. Comprehensive analysis of chromothripsis in 2,658 human cancers using whole-genome sequencing. Nat Genet 2020;52(3):331-341.Abstract
Chromothripsis is a mutational phenomenon characterized by massive, clustered genomic rearrangements that occurs in cancer and other diseases. Recent studies in selected cancer types have suggested that chromothripsis may be more common than initially inferred from low-resolution copy-number data. Here, as part of the Pan-Cancer Analysis of Whole Genomes (PCAWG) Consortium of the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we analyze patterns of chromothripsis across 2,658 tumors from 38 cancer types using whole-genome sequencing data. We find that chromothripsis events are pervasive across cancers, with a frequency of more than 50% in several cancer types. Whereas canonical chromothripsis profiles display oscillations between two copy-number states, a considerable fraction of events involve multiple chromosomes and additional structural alterations. In addition to non-homologous end joining, we detect signatures of replication-associated processes and templated insertions. Chromothripsis contributes to oncogene amplification and to inactivation of genes such as mismatch-repair-related genes. These findings show that chromothripsis is a major process that drives genome evolution in human cancer.
Akdemir KC, Le VT, Chandran S, Li Y, Verhaak RG, Beroukhim R, Campbell PJ, Chin L, Dixon JR, Futreal AP, Futreal AP, PCAWG Structural Variation Working Group (incl. Lee EA). Disruption of chromatin folding domains by somatic genomic rearrangements in human cancer. Nat Genet 2020;52(3):294-305.Abstract
Chromatin is folded into successive layers to organize linear DNA. Genes within the same topologically associating domains (TADs) demonstrate similar expression and histone-modification profiles, and boundaries separating different domains have important roles in reinforcing the stability of these features. Indeed, domain disruptions in human cancers can lead to misregulation of gene expression. However, the frequency of domain disruptions in human cancers remains unclear. Here, as part of the Pan-Cancer Analysis of Whole Genomes (PCAWG) Consortium of the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), which aggregated whole-genome sequencing data from 2,658 cancers across 38 tumor types, we analyzed 288,457 somatic structural variations (SVs) to understand the distributions and effects of SVs across TADs. Notably, SVs can lead to the fusion of discrete TADs, and complex rearrangements markedly change chromatin folding maps in the cancer genomes. Notably, only 14% of the boundary deletions resulted in a change in expression in nearby genes of more than twofold.
Sieverling L, Hong C, Koser SD, Ginsbach P, Kleinheinz K, Hutter B, Braun DM, Cortés-Ciriano I, Xi R, Kabbe R, Park PJ, Eils R, Schlesner M, PCAWG Structural Variation Working Group (incl. Lee EA), Brors B, Rippe K, Jones DTW, Feuerbach L, Feuerbach L. Genomic footprints of activated telomere maintenance mechanisms in cancer. Nat Commun 2020;11(1):733.Abstract
Cancers require telomere maintenance mechanisms for unlimited replicative potential. They achieve this through TERT activation or alternative telomere lengthening associated with ATRX or DAXX loss. Here, as part of the ICGC/TCGA Pan-Cancer Analysis of Whole Genomes (PCAWG) Consortium, we dissect whole-genome sequencing data of over 2500 matched tumor-control samples from 36 different tumor types aggregated within the ICGC/TCGA Pan-Cancer Analysis of Whole Genomes (PCAWG) Consortium to characterize the genomic footprints of these mechanisms. While the telomere content of tumors with ATRX or DAXX mutations (ATRX/DAXX) is increased, tumors with TERT modifications show a moderate decrease of telomere content. One quarter of all tumor samples contain somatic integrations of telomeric sequences into non-telomeric DNA. This fraction is increased to 80% prevalence in ATRX/DAXX tumors, which carry an aberrant telomere variant repeat (TVR) distribution as another genomic marker. The latter feature includes enrichment or depletion of the previously undescribed singleton TVRs TTCGGG and TTTGGG, respectively. Our systematic analysis provides new insight into the recurrent genomic alterations associated with telomere maintenance mechanisms in cancer.
Zhang Y, Chen F, Fonseca NA, He Y, Fujita M, Nakagawa H, Zhang Z, Brazma A, Brazma A, PCAWG Structural Variation Working Group (incl. Lee EA), Creighton CJ, Creighton CJ. High-coverage whole-genome analysis of 1220 cancers reveals hundreds of genes deregulated by rearrangement-mediated cis-regulatory alterations. Nat Commun 2020;11(1):736.Abstract
The impact of somatic structural variants (SVs) on gene expression in cancer is largely unknown. Here, as part of the ICGC/TCGA Pan-Cancer Analysis of Whole Genomes (PCAWG) Consortium, which aggregated whole-genome sequencing data and RNA sequencing from a common set of 1220 cancer cases, we report hundreds of genes for which the presence within 100 kb of an SV breakpoint associates with altered expression. For the majority of these genes, expression increases rather than decreases with corresponding breakpoint events. Up-regulated cancer-associated genes impacted by this phenomenon include TERT, MDM2, CDK4, ERBB2, CD274, PDCD1LG2, and IGF2. TERT-associated breakpoints involve ~3% of cases, most frequently in liver biliary, melanoma, sarcoma, stomach, and kidney cancers. SVs associated with up-regulation of PD1 and PDL1 genes involve ~1% of non-amplified cases. For many genes, SVs are significantly associated with increased numbers or greater proximity of enhancer regulatory elements near the gene. DNA methylation near the promoter is often increased with nearby SV breakpoint, which may involve inactivation of repressor elements.
ICGC/TCGA Pan-Cancer Analysis of Whole Genomes Consortium (incl. Lee EA). Pan-cancer analysis of whole genomes. Nature 2020;578(7793):82-93.Abstract
Cancer is driven by genetic change, and the advent of massively parallel sequencing has enabled systematic documentation of this variation at the whole-genome scale. Here we report the integrative analysis of 2,658 whole-cancer genomes and their matching normal tissues across 38 tumour types from the Pan-Cancer Analysis of Whole Genomes (PCAWG) Consortium of the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We describe the generation of the PCAWG resource, facilitated by international data sharing using compute clouds. On average, cancer genomes contained 4-5 driver mutations when combining coding and non-coding genomic elements; however, in around 5% of cases no drivers were identified, suggesting that cancer driver discovery is not yet complete. Chromothripsis, in which many clustered structural variants arise in a single catastrophic event, is frequently an early event in tumour evolution; in acral melanoma, for example, these events precede most somatic point mutations and affect several cancer-associated genes simultaneously. Cancers with abnormal telomere maintenance often originate from tissues with low replicative activity and show several mechanisms of preventing telomere attrition to critical levels. Common and rare germline variants affect patterns of somatic mutation, including point mutations, structural variants and somatic retrotransposition. A collection of papers from the PCAWG Consortium describes non-coding mutations that drive cancer beyond those in the TERT promoter; identifies new signatures of mutational processes that cause base substitutions, small insertions and deletions and structural variation; analyses timings and patterns of tumour evolution; describes the diverse transcriptional consequences of somatic mutation on splicing, expression levels, fusion genes and promoter activity; and evaluates a range of more-specialized features of cancer genomes.
Huang AY*, Li P*, Rodin RE, Kim SN, Dou Y, Kenny CJ, Akula SK, Hodge RD, Bakken TE, Miller JA, Lein ES, Park PJ, Lee EA, Walsh CA. Parallel RNA and DNA analysis after deep sequencing (PRDD-seq) reveals cell type-specific lineage patterns in human brain. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2020;Abstract
Elucidating the lineage relationships among different cell types is key to understanding human brain development. Here we developed parallel RNA and DNA analysis after deep sequencing (PRDD-seq), which combines RNA analysis of neuronal cell types with analysis of nested spontaneous DNA somatic mutations as cell lineage markers, identified from joint analysis of single-cell and bulk DNA sequencing by single-cell MosaicHunter (scMH). PRDD-seq enables simultaneous reconstruction of neuronal cell type, cell lineage, and sequential neuronal formation ("birthdate") in postmortem human cerebral cortex. Analysis of two human brains showed remarkable quantitative details that relate mutation mosaic frequency to clonal patterns, confirming an early divergence of precursors for excitatory and inhibitory neurons, and an "inside-out" layer formation of excitatory neurons as seen in other species. In addition our analysis allows an estimate of excitatory neuron-restricted precursors (about 10) that generate the excitatory neurons within a cortical column. Inhibitory neurons showed complex, subtype-specific patterns of neurogenesis, including some patterns of development conserved relative to mouse, but also some aspects of primate cortical interneuron development not seen in mouse. PRDD-seq can be broadly applied to characterize cell identity and lineage from diverse archival samples with single-cell resolution and in potentially any developmental or disease condition.
Li Y, Roberts ND, Wala JA, Shapira O, Schumacher SE, Kumar K, Khurana E, Waszak S, Korbel JO, Haber JE, Imielinski M, PCAWG Structural Variation Working Group (incl. Lee EA), Weischenfeldt J, Beroukhim R, Campbell PJ, Campbell PJ. Patterns of somatic structural variation in human cancer genomes. Nature 2020;578(7793):112-121.Abstract
A key mutational process in cancer is structural variation, in which rearrangements delete, amplify or reorder genomic segments that range in size from kilobases to whole chromosomes. Here we develop methods to group, classify and describe somatic structural variants, using data from the Pan-Cancer Analysis of Whole Genomes (PCAWG) Consortium of the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), which aggregated whole-genome sequencing data from 2,658 cancers across 38 tumour types. Sixteen signatures of structural variation emerged. Deletions have a multimodal size distribution, assort unevenly across tumour types and patients, are enriched in late-replicating regions and correlate with inversions. Tandem duplications also have a multimodal size distribution, but are enriched in early-replicating regions-as are unbalanced translocations. Replication-based mechanisms of rearrangement generate varied chromosomal structures with low-level copy-number gains and frequent inverted rearrangements. One prominent structure consists of 2-7 templates copied from distinct regions of the genome strung together within one locus. Such cycles of templated insertions correlate with tandem duplications, and-in liver cancer-frequently activate the telomerase gene TERT. A wide variety of rearrangement processes are active in cancer, which generate complex configurations of the genome upon which selection can act.
Rodriguez-Martin B, Alvarez EG, Baez-Ortega A, Zamora J, Supek F, Demeulemeester J, Santamarina M, Ju YS, Temes J, Garcia-Souto D, Detering H, Li Y, Rodriguez-Castro J, Dueso-Barroso A, Bruzos AL, Dentro SC, Blanco MG, Contino G, Ardeljan D, Tojo M, Roberts ND, Zumalave S, Edwards PAW, Weischenfeldt J, Puiggròs M, Chong Z, Chen K, Lee EA, Wala JA, Raine K, Butler A, Waszak SM, Navarro FCP, Schumacher SE, Monlong J, Maura F, Bolli N, Bourque G, Gerstein M, Park PJ, Wedge DC, Beroukhim R, Torrents D, Korbel JO, Martincorena I, Fitzgerald RC, Van Loo P, Kazazian HH, Burns KH, PCAWG-Structural-Variation-Working-Group, Campbell PJ, Tubio JMC, PCAWG-Consortium. Pan-cancer analysis of whole genomes identifies driver rearrangements promoted by LINE-1 retrotransposition. Nat Genet 2020;Abstract
About half of all cancers have somatic integrations of retrotransposons. Here, to characterize their role in oncogenesis, we analyzed the patterns and mechanisms of somatic retrotransposition in 2,954 cancer genomes from 38 histological cancer subtypes within the framework of the Pan-Cancer Analysis of Whole Genomes (PCAWG) project. We identified 19,166 somatically acquired retrotransposition events, which affected 35% of samples and spanned a range of event types. Long interspersed nuclear element (LINE-1; L1 hereafter) insertions emerged as the first most frequent type of somatic structural variation in esophageal adenocarcinoma, and the second most frequent in head-and-neck and colorectal cancers. Aberrant L1 integrations can delete megabase-scale regions of a chromosome, which sometimes leads to the removal of tumor-suppressor genes, and can induce complex translocations and large-scale duplications. Somatic retrotranspositions can also initiate breakage-fusion-bridge cycles, leading to high-level amplification of oncogenes. These observations illuminate a relevant role of L1 retrotransposition in remodeling the cancer genome, with potential implications for the development of human tumors.
2019
Zhang Y, Yang L, Kucherlapati M, Hadjipanayis A, Pantazi A, Bristow CA, Lee EA, Mahadeshwar HS, Tang J, Zhang J, Seth S, Lee S, Ren X, Song X, Sun H, Seidman J, Luquette LJ, Xi R, Chin L, Protopopov A, Park PJ, Kucherlapati R, Creighton CJ. Global impact of somatic structural variation on the DNA methylome of human cancers [Internet]. Genome Biol 2019;20(1):209. Publisher's VersionAbstract
BACKGROUND: Genomic rearrangements exert a heavy influence on the molecular landscape of cancer. New analytical approaches integrating somatic structural variants (SSVs) with altered gene features represent a framework by which we can assign global significance to a core set of genes, analogous to established methods that identify genes non-randomly targeted by somatic mutation or copy number alteration. While recent studies have defined broad patterns of association involving gene transcription and nearby SSV breakpoints, global alterations in DNA methylation in the context of SSVs remain largely unexplored. RESULTS: By data integration of whole genome sequencing, RNA sequencing, and DNA methylation arrays from more than 1400 human cancers, we identify hundreds of genes and associated CpG islands (CGIs) for which the nearby presence of a somatic structural variant (SSV) breakpoint is recurrently associated with altered expression or DNA methylation, respectively, independently of copy number alterations. CGIs with SSV-associated increased methylation are predominantly promoter-associated, while CGIs with SSV-associated decreased methylation are enriched for gene body CGIs. Rearrangement of genomic regions normally having higher or lower methylation is often involved in SSV-associated CGI methylation alterations. Across cancers, the overall structural variation burden is associated with a global decrease in methylation, increased expression in methyltransferase genes and DNA damage response genes, and decreased immune cell infiltration. CONCLUSION: Genomic rearrangement appears to have a major role in shaping the cancer DNA methylome, to be considered alongside commonly accepted mechanisms including histone modifications and disruption of DNA methyltransferases.
Kim J, Hu C, Moufawad El Achkar C, Black LE, Douville J, Larson A, Pendergast MK, Goldkind SF, Lee EA, Kuniholm A, Soucy A, Vaze J, Belur NR, Fredriksen K, Stojkovska I, Tsytsykova A, Armant M, DiDonato RL, Choi J, Cornelissen L, Pereira LM, Augustine EF, Genetti CA, Dies K, Barton B, Williams L, Goodlett BD, Riley BL, Pasternak A, Berry ER, Pflock KA, Chu S, Reed C, Tyndall K, Agrawal PB, Beggs AH, Grant PE, Urion DK, Snyder RO, Waisbren SE, Poduri A, Park PJ, Patterson A, Biffi A, Mazzulli JR, Bodamer O, Berde CB, Yu TW. Patient-Customized Oligonucleotide Therapy for a Rare Genetic Disease [Internet]. N Engl J Med 2019; Publisher's VersionAbstract
Genome sequencing is often pivotal in the diagnosis of rare diseases, but many of these conditions lack specific treatments. We describe how molecular diagnosis of a rare, fatal neurodegenerative condition led to the rational design, testing, and manufacture of milasen, a splice-modulating antisense oligonucleotide drug tailored to a particular patient. Proof-of-concept experiments in cell lines from the patient served as the basis for launching an "N-of-1" study of milasen within 1 year after first contact with the patient. There were no serious adverse events, and treatment was associated with objective reduction in seizures (determined by electroencephalography and parental reporting). This study offers a possible template for the rapid development of patient-customized treatments. (Funded by Mila's Miracle Foundation and others.).
Yang L, Wang S, Lee JJ, Lee S, Lee E, Shinbrot E, Wheeler DA, Kucherlapati R, Park PJ. An enhanced genetic model of colorectal cancer progression history [Internet]. Genome Biol 2019;20:168. Publisher's VersionAbstract
BACKGROUND: The classical genetic model of colorectal cancer presents APC mutations as the earliest genomic alterations, followed by KRAS and TP53 mutations. However, the timing and relative order of clonal expansion and other types of genomic alterations, such as genomic rearrangements, are still unclear. RESULTS: Here, we perform comprehensive bioinformatic analysis to dissect the relative timing of somatic genetic alterations in 63 colorectal cancers with whole-genome sequencing data. Utilizing allele fractions of somatic single nucleotide variants as molecular clocks while accounting for the presence of copy number changes and structural alterations, we identify key events in the evolution of colorectal tumors. We find that driver point mutations, gene fusions, and arm-level copy losses typically arise early in tumorigenesis; different mechanisms act on distinct genomic regions to drive DNA copy changes; and chromothripsis-clustered rearrangements previously thought to occur as a single catastrophic event-is frequent and may occur multiple times independently in the same tumor through different mechanisms. Furthermore, our computational approach reveals that, in contrast to recent studies, selection is often present on subclones and that multiple evolutionary models can operate in a single tumor at different stages. CONCLUSION: Combining these results, we present a refined tumor progression model which significantly expands our understanding of the tumorigenic process of human colorectal cancer.
2018
Kang Y, Nam S-H, Park KS, Kim J-W, Lee EA, Ko JM, Lee K-A**, Park I**. DeviCNV: Detection and Visualization of Exon-Level Copy Number Variants in Targeted Next Generation Sequencing Data [Internet]. BMC Bioinformatics 2018;19(381) Publisher's VersionAbstract

Background

Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) is increasingly being adopted in clinical laboratories for genomic diagnostic tests.

Results

We developed a new computational method, DeviCNV, intended for the detection of exon-level copy number variants (CNVs) in targeted NGS data. DeviCNV builds linear regression models with bootstrapping for every probe to capture the relationship between read depth of an individual probe and the median of read depth values of all probes in the sample. From the regression models, it estimates the read depth ratio of the observed and predicted read depth with confidence interval for each probe which is applied to a circular binary segmentation (CBS) algorithm to obtain CNV candidates. Then, it assigns confidence scores to those candidates based on the reliability and strength of the CNV signals inferred from the read depth ratios of the probes within them. Finally, it also provides gene-centric plots with confidence levels of CNV candidates for visual inspection. We applied DeviCNV to targeted NGS data generated for newborn screening and demonstrated its ability to detect novel pathogenic CNVs from clinical samples.

Conclusions

We propose a new pragmatic method for detecting CNVs in targeted NGS data with an intuitive visualization and a systematic method to assign confidence scores for candidate CNVs. Since DeviCNV was developed for use in clinical diagnosis, sensitivity is increased by the detection of exon-level CNVs.

Zhang Y*, Yang L*, Kucherlapati M*, Chen F, Hadjipanayis A, Pantazi A, Bristow CA, Lee EA, .., Creighton CJ. A Pan-Cancer Compendium of Genes Deregulated by Somatic Genomic Rearrangement across More Than 1,400 Cases. Cell Reports 2018;10(24(2):515-527.Abstract
A systematic cataloguing of genes impacted by genomic rearrangement, using multiple patient cohorts and cancer types, can provide insight into cancer-relevant alterations outside of exome boundaries. By integrative analysis of whole genome sequencing (predominantly low pass) and gene expression data from 1448 cancers involving 18 histopathological types in The Cancer Genome Atlas, we identified hundreds of genes for which the nearby presence (within 100kb) of a somatic Structural Variant (SV) breakpoint was associated with altered expression. While genomic rearrangements were associated with widespread copy number alteration (CNA) patterns, approximately 1100 genes—including over-expressed cancer driver genes (e.g. TERT, ERBB2, CDK12, CDK4) and under-expressed tumor suppressors (e.g. TP53, RB1, PTEN, STK11)—showed SV-associated deregulation independent of CNA. SVs associated with disruption of topologically-associated domains, enhancer hijacking, or fusion transcripts were implicated in gene up-regulation patterns. For cancer-relevant pathways, SVs considerably extended upon how genes are impacted, beyond point mutation or CNA.
Jung H, Choi** J, Lee EA**. Immune signatures correlate with L1 retrotransposition in gastrointestinal cancers [Internet]. Genome Research 2018;28(8):1136-1146. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) retrotransposons are normally suppressed in somatic tissues mainly due to DNA methylation and antiviral defense. However, the mechanism to suppress L1s may be disrupted in cancers, thus allowing L1s to act as insertional mutagens and cause genomic rearrangement and instability. Whereas the frequency of somatic L1 insertions varies greatly among individual tumors, much remains to be learned about underlying genetic, cellular, or environmental factors. Here, we report multiple correlates of L1 activity in stomach, colorectal, and esophageal tumors through an integrative analysis of cancer whole genome and matched RNA sequencing profiles. Clinical indicators of tumor progression, such as tumor grade and patient age, showed positive association. A potential L1 expression suppressor, TP53, was mutated in tumors with frequent L1 insertions. We characterized the effects of somatic L1 insertions on mRNA splicing and expression, and demonstrated an increased risk of gene disruption in retrotransposition-prone cancers. In particular, we found that a cancer-specific L1 insertion in an exon of MOV10, a key L1 suppressor, caused exon skipping and decreased expression of the affected allele due to nonsense-mediated decay in a tumor with a high L1 insertion load. Importantly, tumors with high immune activity, for example, those associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection or microsatellite instability, tended to carry a low number of L1 insertions in genomes with high expression levels of L1 suppressors such as APOBEC3s and SAMHD1. Our results indicate that cancer immunity may contribute to genome stability by suppressing L1 retrotransposition in gastrointestinal cancers.
2017
McConnell MJ*, Moran JV*, Abyzov A, Akbarian S, Bae T, Cortes-Ciriano I, Erwin JA, Fasching L, Flasch DA, Freed D, Ganz J, Jaffe AE, Kwan KY, Kwon M, Lodato MA, Mills RE, Paquola ACM, Rodin RE, Rosenbluh C, Sestan N, Sherman MA, Shin JH, Song S, Straub RE, Thorpe J, Weinberger DR, Urban AE, Zhou B, Gage FH, Lehner T, Senthil G, Walsh CA, Chess A, Courchesne E, Gleeson JG, Kidd JM, Park PJ, Pevsner J, Vaccarino FM, Brain Somatic Mosaicism Network (incl. Lee EA). Intersection of diverse neuronal genomes and neuropsychiatric disease: The Brain Somatic Mosaicism Network. Science 2017;356(6336)Abstract
Neuropsychiatric disorders have a complex genetic architecture. Human genetic population-based studies have identified numerous heritable sequence and structural genomic variants associated with susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disease. However, these germline variants do not fully account for disease risk. During brain development, progenitor cells undergo billions of cell divisions to generate the ~80 billion neurons in the brain. The failure to accurately repair DNA damage arising during replication, transcription, and cellular metabolism amid this dramatic cellular expansion can lead to somatic mutations. Somatic mutations that alter subsets of neuronal transcriptomes and proteomes can, in turn, affect cell proliferation and survival and lead to neurodevelopmental disorders. The long life span of individual neurons and the direct relationship between neural circuits and behavior suggest that somatic mutations in small populations of neurons can significantly affect individual neurodevelopment. The Brain Somatic Mosaicism Network has been founded to study somatic mosaicism both in neurotypical human brains and in the context of complex neuropsychiatric disorders.
Park J, Lee E, Park K-J, Park H-D, Kim J-W, Woo HI, Lee KH, Lee K-T, Lee JK, Park J-O, Park YS, Heo JS, Choi SH, Choi DW, Jang K-T, Lee S-Y. Large-scale clinical validation of biomarkers for pancreatic cancer using a mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach. Oncotarget 2017;8(26):42761-42771.Abstract
We performed an integrated analysis of proteomic and transcriptomic datasets to develop potential diagnostic markers for early pancreatic cancer. In the discovery phase, a multiple reaction monitoring assay of 90 proteins identified by either gene expression analysis or global serum proteome profiling was established and applied to 182 clinical specimens. Nine proteins (P < 0.05) were selected for the independent validation phase and quantified using stable isotope dilution-multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry in 456 specimens. Of these proteins, four proteins (apolipoprotein A-IV, apolipoprotein CIII, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1) were significantly altered in pancreatic cancer in both the discovery and validation phase (P < 0.01). Moreover, a panel including carbohydrate antigen 19-9, apolipoprotein A-IV and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 showed better performance for distinguishing early pancreatic cancer from pancreatitis (Area under the curve = 0.934, 86% sensitivity at fixed 90% specificity) than carbohydrate antigen 19-9 alone (71% sensitivity).Overall, we present the panel of robust biomarkers for early pancreatic cancer diagnosis through bioinformatics analysis that combined transcriptomic and proteomic data as well as rigorous validation on a large number of independent clinical samples.

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